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My pet needs to see a vet… but is it an emergency?

Obviously, if you have any doubts - give your vet a ring! There’ll always be someone on duty who will be able to give advice over the phone, even if it isn’t an emergency that needs seeing right now. However, there are only thirteen or fourteen conditions that are genuinely life-or-death emergencies, and these need seeing RIGHT NOW. If your pet is suffering from one of the following conditions, they need seeing - as soon as possible. So, don’t delay - call your vet and then get in the car and drive!
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Best UK Vet Awards 2017 – the Results are In!

You may have seen quite a bit about the Best UK Vets Awards recently (especially if you follow our Facebook page!). What are the Best UK Vet Awards? It is vital for people to know which businesses offer the best customer service - and when we’re entrusting the health of our pets to them, it’s doubly important. So, we sponsor these Awards, which are now in their fifth year. The way it works is very simple:
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Vets are now doctors (in a strictly veterinary sense, that is….)

Did you know that your vet is now a doctor? The Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons  has just changed the rules. Vets are not obliged to call themselves "Doctor", but we now have the option to do so, if we wish. Traditionally, vets were called "Mr": the logic was that as "veterinary surgeons", we fell into the same (slightly superior) category of medical personnel as medical consultant surgeons, who were also "Mr". Dentists (dental surgeons) were also called "Mr" for the same reason. In the past thirty years, two factors have moved against this traditional nomenclature.

The veterinary profession has been feminised.

In the 1960's, over 80% of veterinary graduates were male. The gender ratio moved to 50:50 in the 1980's, and it's now changed so that a high majority of new graduates are female, 57% of the total profession in practice are female. Why is this relevant to the "doctor" issue? Well, "Mr" may be a handy title for male vets, but there's a dilemma for females: there's an awkward choice between Miss ("young and single?"), Mrs ("married") or Ms ("feminist?"). The term "Dr" is gender neutral, which suits our politically correct era.

Most vets around the world are "doctors"

The second, and probably more significant, reason for change in terminology is to keep the UK within international norms. In nearly every other country in the world, vets are known as "Dr". So when British vets travel overseas, it causes mild consternation if they try to stick to the "Mr" title from home. And when foreign vets visit the UK, they naturally expect to be called "Dr", leading to some confusion for members of the public ("Are they better qualified than British vets?")

Vets, vet nurses and the public voted for vets to be doctors

The decision to change to "Dr" was democratic: the RCVS carried out a consultation process, receiving the opinions of over 11000 people, 74% from vets, vet students and veterinary nurse, and 26% from the public. Overall, 81% were in favour of vets becoming "doctors", 13% were against, and 6% did not mind either way. The RCVS has placed some stipulations about how vets use the term "Dr", to avoid the risk of misleading people about our qualifications. The two possible misapprehensions are first, that we have earned a doctorate (PhD), and second, that we are medical doctors. To avoid the risk of this happening, vets have to do one of two things. First, add the word "Veterinary Surgeon" as a post-script to our names ("Dr Pete Wedderburn, Veterinary Surgeon") or second, add our post-nominal letters our names ("Dr Pete Wedderburn MRCVS"). This is a clear way of defining that we are "vet doctors" rather than "doctorate doctors" or "doctor doctors". I'm sure it seems like trivial stuff to most members of the public, but to those folk who are concerned about these details, it's very important to get it right. And it is important, that when people consult a professional, whether online or in person, that they have a correct understanding of that individual's qualifications. I never thought I'd be a doctor, but all of a sudden, I've become one without even trying. A doctor, veterinary surgeon, or a doctor, MRCVS, that is, of course.  
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Are you ready for the year ahead? – the pet calendar with a difference!

So, here we are, another year ahead! Are you ready? What might 2014 hold for you and your pets? January Let the dieting begin! With a third of pets in the UK carrying too much weight, many of us will have animals who could join us on the tradition post Christmas slim down! Have a chat to local vets about the different things you can do. Cutting down on meals and treats, changing the make of food you give, altering how you feed them (for example changing from a simple bowl to a puzzle feeder); are all small changes that can make a big difference! Also, encouraging your pets to exercise more will speed up their slim down, not always easy for cats but if you have dogs, more walks will be beneficial to you both! February For me, this is one of the most depressing months of the year. The long, cold nights have been going on for what seems like forever & Spring seems a long way away. It is often also the time of year snow arrives, which can cause our pets as many problems as our cars! Take care to ensure any rabbits or other pets kept outdoors are well insulated against the cold and check your dogs feet carefully for ice balls and grit after road walks, both of which can cause painful problems. However, the weather can be fun as well! Don’t forget to throw a few snowballs for the dog (and maybe the cat as well!) Also, what about Valentines day, will your pets be getting a gift?! March Spring is just around the corner! And summer ’isn't that far away! If you are planning a getaway abroad with your pets, now is the time to start thinking about rabies vaccines and getting their passport sorted, so you aren't on the last minute nearer the time. It is also a good times to book the kennels and cattery if they aren't coming with you, the good ones will get booked up quickly! April Now the days are getting longer, use it as an opportunity to go out for more walks with your dogs. I often see them a bit porkier at this time of year when the early nights and working days mean they can’t be taken out as much but most soon lose the pounds around now! Also, it’s Easter time! Which means chocolate eggs! Just remember to be careful and keep all these tasty treats out of reach of dogs. Chocolate is toxic to them, especially the dark kind, and can cause significant problems (and copious diarrhoea!) May Fireworks season may seem a long way away (and it is!) but if you have a pet who is scared of them, now is the time to start planning. One of the best ways of desensitising noise program. The best is SOUNDS SCARY, which is available as a download. It comes with full instructions, have been designed by a vet and can be very helpful! You won’t regret it! June Summer holidays are just around the corner! If your pets are not coming away with you, now is the time to check all their vaccinations are up to date, especially as if they have over-run it can take up to a month to get back on track. Also, most kennels will require dogs to have a kennel cough vaccine, which is most effective given a fortnight or more before they go in. June is also often Microchipping Month at many vet practices, so if your pets aren’t done, now is a good time! July The holidays are here! Why not use this time and the longer days to explore your local area with your dog. Websites like walkiees.co.uk and dogfriendlybritain.co.uk have lots of information on dog friendly walks, beaches and attractions on your area. Cats will also be spending more time outside (if it is sunny!) but some people worry about them wandering. Simple changes to your garden like planting cat nip, creating resting places in high positions and leaving areas over-grown for them to hide in will all encourage them to hang out in your back yard rather than doing too much exploring! August Hopefully the weather won’t let us down and we will have some sunshine! Warmer days are great for getting out and about with our pets but you do have to be careful, especially with dogs who have short noses. These breeds are particularly vulnerable to over-heating, which can be very dangerous, so should only be exercised during the cooler parts of the day. Also, make sure outdoor pets like rabbits get a chance to run about in the sun and that they have plenty of water and access to shade September Back to school - boo! As well as for kids, this can be a depressing time of year for dogs as well, who have been used to having the family around in the day and they can start acting out. Make the change less difficult by making sure they aren't suddenly left alone for long periods and use ADAPTIL collars for those who are particularly anxious. Also, why don’t they go back to school as well?! Dogs of all ages benefit from regular training classes and it is a great way of spending quality time with them. October Autumn is now well underway and the temperatures are dropping. Depressing but at least you don’t have to worry now about fleas, right? Wrong! This time of year is actually the worst for infestations because as the weather gets colder, our houses get warmer. By turning on our central heating we create tropical flea paradises for them to enjoy and reproduce at will, if we don’t keep out pets protected. So, if you haven’t treated your pets recently, now is the time to get to your vets for some spot-ons and if you do keep them covered, remember to continue, even in the winter months! November Fireworks season is upon us! Hopefully, if you started Sounds Scary in May, things will be better for scared pets but all benefit from some extra TLC when the sky lights up! Help indoor pets by drawing the curtains, preventing access to outside, creating a cosy den behind the sofa to muffle the noises and use ADAPTIL and FELIWAY plug-ins for particularly worried animals. Make sure outdoor animals are protected by ensuring their hutches are also well insulated against the noises and that they have lots of bedding to burrow in. December It’s Christmas! This can be a really fun time of year for sociable animals, with all the visiting and entertaining that goes on but others can find it very stressful, especially, if they are shy. If your pets don’t feel like greeting people, don’t make them, let them come round in their own time. Also, be careful with all the yummy food in the house! Chocolate is very tempting to dogs but can be harmful, as can anything with lots of raisins such as Christmas pud or mince pies. And if you have cats, make sure the tree is very stable! More than one kitty has been spotted peering out from between the branches or playing pat-a-cake with the baubles! Finally, don’t forget to buy your furry friends a gift for under the tree - but I don’t need to remind you about that do I! What will you get them?! My very best wishes to you and your furry families for a happy and healthy 2014! Cat Henstridge BVSc MRCVS - Read more of her blogs at www.catthevet.com
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So You Want To Be A Vet? – Getting into vet school and beyond

I did and I still do! Being a vet is a brilliant job; every day is different. I get to work with great people and use the skills I worked hard to gain to help animals and solve their problems. However, it is also involves long hours, regular challenges, with both pets and people, and it can be very stressful. The first hurdle to being a vet is actually getting into vet school and with an average of nine applicants for every place, it is one of the most competitive university courses there is. The standard of students is always extremely high and I know the selectors face a very difficult task in picking out those best suited for a career in veterinary medicine. First and foremost, you must get the right grades at both GCSE and A Level. Without these you won’t even be considered and rightly so; academically the vet course is tough. However, as well as being a geek (!), you also need to have excellent people skills, good practical skills and, I believe, bags of common sense. You can help to show you have these by ensuring your extracurricular activities are relevant and varied; music, sports, volunteering and Duke of Edinburgh all regularly appear on successful candidates applications. The other vital piece of the puzzle is completing a diverse range of work experience to demonstrate you really understand the veterinary industry. Trust me, it’s not all cuddling cute animals! The most obvious place to start is in a vet clinic but this can be difficult. Most practices receive a large number of requests but do persevere. You should also spend some time on farms getting your hands dirty. Helping out at milking time and lambing is not glamorous but will be rewarding & very useful. To stand out from the crowd you could also consider seeing other aspects of veterinary work such as zoos and exotic pets, abattoirs (all of which need a vet on the premises while they are operating) and scientific laboratories. Many vets are involved in research and during the course you will spend quite a bit of time in the lab! Wanting to be a vet for most people is a passion and very few probably give much thought to what working as a vet is actually like. It is a cliche to say it is more a way of life than a job but veterinary is certainly not 9-5! Many positions will include on call, meaning you will be working in the night and often the next day as well. A great deal of veterinary medicine, particularly for the farm and horse vets, is done alone, which can be stressful and even the small animal vets in a clinic will be expected to make their own decisions from day one and perform surgery single handedly. This is difficult when you first start and although it gets easier, it is always a challenge! It is also important to consider the salary you are likely to earn. This is often something students don’t consider important but it soon becomes so when you have a mortgage to pay and a family to support! As a vet you will always be paid a good wage but it is very much less than similarly qualified professionals. Trust me, you soon get tired of clients thinking you earn as much as a doctor when it is more likely to be a third of that! Being a vet is wonderful and I feel very fortunate to be in my dream job. However, I confess when I set my heart on it I gave very little thought to the practicalities of life with long hours, on-call, demanding owners and difficult cases. Although, to be honest, even if I had it wouldn’t have changed my mind! If you are sure you want to be a vet; have the drive, intelligence and I haven’t put you off (!), then my advice is work hard, go for it and maybe one day, I’ll see you in theatre! Cat Henstridge BVSc MRCVS - Read more of her blogs at catthevet.com
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