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Clicker Training – how does it work?

Clicker training is a very common way of teaching a dog a new trick, or skill, or behaviour. However, it can also be used in other animals - including cats, horses and even rabbits! The basic principle is very simple, but using it, we can teach our pets all sorts of behaviours by using a fun, positive method.
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Does my cat need company?

This is a question vets hear a lot - people who are worried that their cat will be lonely, or need a companion. So in this blog, we’re going to look into it in more detail for you!
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Why hasn’t the Dangerous Dogs Act stopped “dog attacks”?

The bottom line is that the DDA was never intended to prevent any and all dog attacks, or injuries to people caused by dogs. There are a number of reasons for this, but primarily the law was passed to protect the public from certain types of dog, and to allow the police to prosecute people who let their dogs attack a person. The effectiveness of this law has been widely questioned, not least by vets, the RSPCA and many animal owners, who have argued that it was an overreaction. However, some campaigners and victims of dog bites maintain it needs to be made stronger and stricter.
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5 things to think about when training rhinos (if you don’t have a rhino a dog will do just fine…)

Okay, so training a rhino is something that only a few people get to do. However, working close quarters with any animal can be enormously rewarding, especially when you achieve something together. Positive reinforcement training is the primary method used by professional animal trainers to work with their charges and it is a fantastic way to enrich an animal’s life and reduce potential stress.
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Why do dogs wag their tails?

There are few things more cheering than the sight of a wagging tail but what is your dog actually trying to tell you?  Certainly, it can indicate happiness but also a lot of other things as well!

  • A tail held high and vigorously wagged from side to side indicates its owner is happy and ready to play.
  • A tail held level with the body and wagged more slowly shows that the dog is in a situation where they are not quite sure what is going on but are interested and paying attention.
  • A tail held low and wagging only a little or twitching, is often showing that the dog is feeling threatened and you should approach and handle them with caution.
  • A tail tucked up and under the body means that the dog is frightened and showing submission.  With reassurance they may start to feel more confident but again, you should take care with them to ensure they don’t progress to growling, or even biting, to make the perceived threat retreat.
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