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Help asap

Published on: November 25, 2022 • By: natadog · In Forum: Dogs
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natadog
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November 25, 2022 at 10:21pm
We have video, but our dog is experiencing very bizarre behavior suddenly- vet said it appeared she got ahold of some form of speed but this is now happening multiple times a week. She is having jolting muscle movements and spams she can’t control. Rapid eye and movements (head circling round and round) eyes looking all around rapidly as if she is paranoid or looking for something. No appetite when this is happening. We will jump up and spin in circle. Feet tapping. Now throwning up spittle,white like foam.
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Liz Buchanan BVSc MRCVS
Moderator
November 25, 2022 at 10:55pm
That sounds like a scary thing to be witnessing.  It may be behavioural, but I think the concern is that it could be neurological or neurological secondary to something else (for example, low blood sugar or liver changes might effect the nerves).  I can understand why, after a single incidence and then everything returning to normal, a vet might suggest that a toxin had passed through the system.  But as it is now happening increasingly often and getting worse, this theory might have become less likely (unless, for example, they are in a position that they might regularly find drugs on the floor) and other suggestions, such as fitting or even a lesion on the brain, might be more likely than they previously seemed.  We would strongly recommend going back to your vet with the new evidence of more fits.  If it happens again in the meantime, videoing the incident may provide good clues and it helps to try to figure out whether you have some warning before it happened and / or a change in behaviour afterwards.  In the past, if a dog didn't lose consciousness then we believed that neurological incidents weren't really 'fits,' but actually things aren't so clear-cut as that.  Your vet might also want to check bloods to check for underlying liver changes etc. or to carry out a neurological examination.  Where finances are available, neurological imaging can sometimes be helpful too.
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Liz Buchanan BVSc MRCVS
Moderator
November 25, 2022 at 10:58pm
If your dog has had such a 'fit' tonight, then keep any lights and noises low.  You should call your emergency vets for triage in order that you know how soon your dog needs to be seen.
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natadog
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November 25, 2022 at 11:22pm
Thank you for your reply. The night we brought her to the vet about a 2 weeks ago was a 24 hour vet, they did take blood and found no issues in the results, also asked if we wanted to have an mri done but unfortunately the price is way out of our budget especially since the charge for that night was very high. We will try to keep it quiet and less lit when this happens again. We will also try a regular day time vet which may be a little less pricey. I have a concern possibly the food she is eating, or she is holding her bowel movement. It seems she is scared to go outside her doggy door unless I go with her, which she loved to do before. But she will throw up sometimes also she wants to stand on her hind legs or sit up, and push her back against a wall or my hand. I have changed her diet to the refrigerated food for dogs, I may go back to the soft packets we used to get her and see if that changes anything.
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Liz Buchanan BVSc MRCVS
Moderator
November 25, 2022 at 11:51pm
I understand about the MRI.  This is interesting-  I don't imagine that safe dog food would directly cause cause fits or neurological behaviour, but there are circumstances under which it might indirectly do so.  In some liver problems, for example, the liver doesn't filter dietary toxins (ammonia) out of the blood in the way that it should and therefore the toxins go to the brain.  Night vets are good at acting in such ways as are relevant to keep an animal safe in the immediate term.  Sometimes they are absolutely essential where fitting is concerned.  If an animal is, and remains, stable, then background work-ups may become 'normal' veterinary territory.  Obviously I am in no position to judge what is needed here, but wishing you all best over the next few days and do please let us know how you get on.
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