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Kitten squired clear liquid ball on eyeball while cleaning eye booger

Published on: June 12, 2022 • By: CELEB1703 · In Forum: Kittens
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CELEB1703
Participant
June 12, 2022 at 05:35am
Will my kitten be blind? Will it recover to generate new cornea aquaeous humor
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Liz Buchanan BVSc MRCVS
Keymaster
June 12, 2022 at 09:45am
Hello!  I'm not clear from your message what has happened to your kittens' eye but it sounds as though a chemical of some kind has come into contact with it.   If so, this can be extremely serious and you need to contact your emergency vet with no delay. Sometimes kittens are permanently blind after an incident like that and often they are in pain. Please let me know how you get on.  
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Liz Buchanan BVSc MRCVS
Keymaster
June 12, 2022 at 09:49am
Corneal tissue can repair eg small ocular ulcers can mend, but slowly.  You mention aqueous humour - did the wound go full thickness?   If that's the case then someone who can see the eye needs to comment, because that sounds to be exceptionally deep, serious damage.
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Liz Buchanan BVSc MRCVS
Keymaster
June 12, 2022 at 09:52am
On the other hand, if the liquid was water and there was no other trauma, there may be nothing to worry about!  Definitely further information is needed before anyone can answer this question.  As the case sounds like an emergency, your own vet or opthalmologist who has seen the eye is probably the best person to ask.
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Liz Buchanan BVSc MRCVS
Keymaster
June 12, 2022 at 09:55am
Hmmm a second interpretation of your words is that clear water came from a kittens eye while you were cleaning something sticky from it.  This could be tears to protect the eye but if it were aqueous humour from inside the eye than that would be serious.  How does the eye look now?  If it looks at all abnormal, you should contact your emergency vet for advice.
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CELEB1703
Participant
June 12, 2022 at 04:08pm
Im trully devastated...iveIMG_20220612_230717 brought the kitten to the vet...but not satisfied by their opinion...im about to bring my kitten to another vet tomorrow for 2nd opinion and hopefully treatment to save the kittens eye....pls pray for kitten...i have 6 kittens overall...only one kitten has infected eyes...pls dont judge.🙏😭
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CELEB1703
Participant
June 12, 2022 at 04:17pm
Thank you for all your responses....
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Liz Buchanan BVSc MRCVS
Keymaster
June 12, 2022 at 07:06pm
Hello again - thankyou for the picture.  The eye in the picture looks very enlarged / pushed forward, with nearly 50% of the globe exposed, compared with the small amount of eye usually exposed to the outside world (see other eye, perhaps, or a  normal kitten's eye, for comparison).  I am unable to say what has caused this, but your vet will be able to see more and therefore have an idea.  Perhaps the eye has developed incorrectly or there is something behind it pushing it forward, or perhaps the pressure in the eyeball is very high (glaucoma) or something else.  A secondary problem may be that the tear film is not correctly distributed over the top, leaving the globe vulnerable to drying, ulceration and damage and potentially extremely sore.  Your vet - and / or second opinion vet - will also be able to tell you what amount of sight the kitten is likely to have going forward. There may also be other problems or infections present and they, having examined the kitten, are the best people to advise you about this. It may be that the best option, if the prognosis for sight is low, is to remove the eye completely.  Cats do very well with a single eye.  Again, this may be affected by other underlying problems. Bets of luck and please do let us know how you get on.  In the short term, it may be very important to have sufficient and appropriate pain relief for the kitten.        
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Liz Buchanan BVSc MRCVS
Keymaster
June 12, 2022 at 07:38pm
(pain relief should always be diagnosed by a vet - some common human options can make cats very poorly).
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