Home Forums Puppies Puppy vomiting intermittently

Puppy vomiting intermittently

Published on: July 20, 2021 • By: grabmeagoldone · In Forum: Puppies
Author
Topic
grabmeagoldone
Participant
July 20, 2021 at 04:56pm
Reggie is a 6-month old golden retriever.  He’s been throwing up a lot lately (intermittently) and I’m wondering if this is just “puppy tummy” stuff that happens as they grow or something else. More info: ▪️when he vomits it tends to be fast - no warning/ retching. It’s always a lot (entire contents of his stomach, sometimes just bile if we’ve tried withholding food for a bit) ▪️I can’t see a connection between vomiting and anything else (such as right after eating, playing, drinking a lot). ▪️his appetite and activity levels are normal. ▪️ 💩 is fine. It’s only the other end. I don’t think he’s gotten into anything - he’s very well supervised and also a great puppy (he’s never eaten or destroyed anything) though I suppose that’s certainly possible. He’s eating Wellness large breed puppy kibble (chicken). Past couple days we’ve been feeding him canned (also chicken based) and that seems to have helped but also maybe just a fluke. He also has never liked his kibble (needs lots of coaxing to eat it) whereas he seems very pleased with canned. Advice for getting to the bottom of this and treating all much appreciated! DCFC0EA1-541A-407F-AEEB-6C94A459FD67
Report
Author
Replies
Liz Buchanan BVSc MRCVS
Moderator
July 20, 2021 at 10:57pm
Hello!  You don't mention how often 'intermittently' is (daily?  monthly? several times a day?)  There is also a possibility that you are talking about regurgitation, rather than vomiting (absence of preliminary heaving / retching etc).  The range of possibilities here is huge, from a simple puppyish tendency to eat too much too quickly at one end of the spectrum, to some fairly serious structural problems at the other.  There is, for example, a rare disease in which two heart vessels are linked by a 'strap' of soft tissue, which is tight over the oesophagus and causes regurgitation.  This, fortunately, is much more rare.  The severity / mess / size of the vomit doesn't always reflect the severity of the underlying problem. In the short-term, the vet will want to ensure that your pup isn't losing so much fluid that he is chronically dehydrated, and that he isn't suffering from secondary effects e.g. some regurgitating dogs have a tendency to inhale foodstuffs, affecting their lungs, so this can be a concern with prolonged regurgitation in young dogs.  Perhaps your vet will also have some simple husbandry tips / dietary suggestions that will help.  In the longer-term, your vet may want to pin-point what exactly is causing the problem, which may require trial treatments and / or various tests. I have no way of knowing form my computer which end of the spectrum of severity your handsome boy is at. Therefore, even if the patient appears well in themselves, there is every argument for getting the vet to check things over sooner rather than later.  
Report
Author
Replies
Liz Buchanan BVSc MRCVS
Moderator
July 20, 2021 at 10:59pm
Ps. I know that it's superfluous to your question, but would just like to add that Reggie is extremely handsome.  Best of luck.
Report
Viewing 3 replies - 1 through 3 (of 3 total)

You must be logged in to create new threads, or access some of the forums

Log In
Register

Registration confirmation will be emailed to you

By joining the Forum, I agree that I am aged over 18 and that I will abide by the Community Guidelines and the Terms

Or

Report a Thread or Reply

Thank you for your help. A member of our team will investigate this further.

Back to forum