With so many dogs needing new homes, rescuing a dog is the perfect solution. Virtually all rehoming centres want to ensure they are providing long lasting, loving homes for their pets. They want to ensure security and suitability for both pet and owner. Because of this, there are set requirements that must be met in order to allow you to be accepted for adopting a pet dog. Below, we will discuss our top tips and adaptations you can make to increase your likelihood of being accepted for a dog.

We know it is frustrating – the lists of requirements are long and don’t always seem logical. But the reasoning is sound. Most rehoming centres want to do everything possible to avoid having to re-rehome any of their dogs. And many of them have many years of experience. They know that, statistically, people who do X are unlikely to be able to give a good home; while people who do Y are a much better bet. It’s not necessarily fair on you, but that’s not the aim. The aim is to be fair on the dogs under their care. 

So here are our Top Tips to make yourself as attractive a candidate as possible!

Increase your knowledge about canine behaviour and care

Being aware of the requirements of a dog is essential. There is lots of information online and speaking to other pet owners may be extremely beneficial to you. Most rescue dogs need rehoming through no fault of their own. But others may need training, retraining, or may need bad habits adjusting. Every dog, as a minimum, needs food, water, shelter, the freedom to act normally and the freedom from pain or discomfort. The ability to ‘act normally’ will vary from dog to dog but does entail socialising with other animals as they would desire, moving their body how they would like without being restricted with space.

Ensure you have enough time 

Think about your working hours. Puppies should be left no longer than 4 hours maximum alone, and this amount of time should be an amount which your puppy gradually works up to. Adult dogs may be left for up to 6 hours. If your working hours are not flexible, adopting a dog that is already older and fully trained may work better for you. You may be able to adapt your job or discuss with your boss about having shorter breaks within the day to allow an earlier home time, or doing more work from home if possible. 

You will also need enough time and energy to exercise your dog appropriately. Different dog breeds will need and want different amounts of exercise – this could vary in length, intensity, and variety. If you think you may struggle to exercise frequently, choosing a dog breed that needs less exercise will make you a more suitable owner. The rescue centre will be able to advise on which dogs would suit your needs best.

Make your household environment suitable 

Some pet dogs may specifically not be good around children so if you have children in the household, choosing a pet who is safe and trustworthy around them is advisable. Even then, we would still strongly recommend you supervising your child whenever they are with the dog. Look at different rescue centres’ terms and conditions, as some rescue centres may not allow you to rehome a dog if you have children under a certain age. You must be honest with your application. Some dogs may have specific requirements regarding companions, for example, with or without other dogs, with or without cats. These requirements could be essential for the animal to have a good quality life. 

Visit the rescue centre 

Visiting a rescue centre in person is the best way for you to learn most about the dogs and also, the best way for the rescue centre to learn the most about you! This allows for suitable pairings to be made meaning your bond is more likely to last. By learning what the rescue centres expect from owners and households, you will be able to learn whether you are the right person to be taking on a new pet. You will also get the opportunity to learn about the rescue centre’s individual requirements. 

Donations are always extremely appreciated by rescue centres

If you are able to offer a donation, the rescue centre will be able to fund saving the lives of many other animals. These funds go towards bedding, food, water dishes, leads, collars and veterinary bills amongst other things!

Remember, rehoming centres do want their dogs to find homes, but they want these homes to be well suited

You must be able to provide sufficient housing and a good quality life for a dog. If you do get rejected, ask for feedback and see if the rehoming centre is able to provide feedback regarding why they do not think you are suitable and see if there is a different dog breed or lifestyle change that can be made in order to allow you to adopt your new furry friend!

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